Read

Search form

What’s the Real Cost of Your Cheap Fast Food?

What’s the Real Cost of Your Cheap Fast Food?
Tue, 9/3/2013 - by Fred Kammer
This article originally appeared on Washington Post

Last week, thousands of Americans stepped away from their jobs at fast-food restaurants and into the streets to make a plea: Pay us enough to support ourselves and feed our families. The workers joining this nationwide protest are our neighbors, friends, fellow citizens. But their strike is not just about their plight. It is about all of us, and the kind of country we want to live in.

As economic inequality grows deeper and wider across the nation, we need to remember how deeply unjust it is. It is unjust by the standards of our civic values and of our faith – indeed, in this diverse society, of all faith traditions.

Dr. King, who died while pleading on behalf of underpaid and exploited workers, said, “It is a crime for people to live in this rich nation and receive starvation wages.” Drawing from the same centuries-old Christian teaching, Pope Francis warned, 50 years later, “No amount of peace-building will be able to last, nor will harmony and happiness be attained in a society that ignores, pushes to the margins, or excludes a part of itself.”

The measures of inequality in our society are abundant. While McDonald’s CEO was paid $13.8 million in 2012 and Burger King’s $6.5 million, the average fast-food worker makes $10,000 to $18,000 a year. While corporate profits have ballooned, many workers qualify for food stamps and housing subsidies. Some have to live in homeless shelters.

The majority of fast-food workers, and of those in retail jobs that are just as poorly paid, are adults – their median age is 28 – and more than a quarter of them are raising children. Many are denied full-time work, as employers limit their hours to keep them from qualifying for health insurance and other benefits. In big cities, their rents are high and even public transportation is a financial strain.

What they ask is simply a wage of $15 an hour and the right to form unions. The plea echoes those of the March on Washington 50 years ago, which called for a national minimum wage of $2 an hour. Adjusted for inflation, that would be $15.26 today, or more than twice what the actual minimum wage is. That, too, is barely enough to feed a family.

Religious leaders, among many others, have called for an increase in the minimum wage as the number of Americans living in poverty has grown, but Congress shows no sign of responding. Certainly the fast-food industry, with high unemployment keeping its labor costs down, is not raising standards on its own. And so, once again, workers are taking to the picket lines.

America’s failure to allow so many of its own workers a sustaining wage is only a symptom of a larger sickness, the “culture of selfishness” that Pope Francis recently decried as he lamented the growing chasm between rich and poor.

For the past ten years, wages and salaries for most workers, especially those at the bottom of the income scale, have remained stagnant. While productivity continued to climb, virtually all the economic gains of the last decade have flowed to the very richest among us. We have behaved more as corporate shareholders than as community shareholders committed to the common good. As support programs for the poor have been cut, we have looked away, embodying what Pope Francis calls the “globalization of indifference.” We have accepted the notion that those at the bottom, no matter how hard they work, are somehow undeserving.

From its earliest days, Christianity has condemned avarice and embraced community. Jesus told parables of the need to pay workers a just wage, as did the Old Testament prophets before him and church leaders and scholars for centuries after him. The call for justice in the treatment of workers is a moral imperative. The doctrine does not change with time or political or economic trends, but has guided spiritual leaders for centuries.

That is why clergy across America are supporting the workers who, at risk to their livelihoods, are taking to the streets in 40 cities. They are appealing not just to their employers but to all who should be their allies. It is our country, our future, and our conscience.

Originally published by Washington Post

Add new comment

Sign Up

Article Tabs

wealth inequality, income inequality, Fat Cat Wednesday, corporate pay, executive pay, National Living Wage, U.K. anti-austerity protests

Findings from the High Pay Centre show jaw-dropping levels of inequality in Britain, where executives earning £1,000 per hour exceeded the average U.K. annual salary of £28,000 by lunchtime on Jan. 3 – dubbed Fat Cat Wednesday.

Tony Atkinson, wealth inequality, income inequality, Obamacare, affordable healthcare, gutting healthcare, Republican agenda, Donald Trump, tax cuts for the rich

With a new Congress and White House committed to wealth’s concentration, we’ll sorely miss the scholar who dedicated his life to documenting wealth’s maldistribution.

Nicaragua renewable energy, clean energy revolution, solar power, wind power, renewables revolution

In 2012, Nicaragua invested the fifth highest percentage worldwide of its GDP in developing renewable energy, and now it is reaping the benefits.

Greek healthcare crisis, Greek austerity crisis, Greek austerity policies, Syriza party

Due to imposed austerity cuts, 850 medical clinics have closed, 10,000 beds have been shut down and 30,000 healthcare professionals were removed from frontline positions – while those who remained saw wages cut by 50 percent.

Zapatistas, EZLN, Mexico indigenous populations, Chiapas struggle, direct democracy, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés

“This council proposes to govern this country,” the Zapatista Army of National Liberation said.

creative activism, Act Out, 1984, George Orwell, Ministry of Truth, NDAA, Global Engagement Center, Countering Disinformation and Propaganda Act, red scare, blame russia, James Clapper, NSA, national intelligence, CIA, Russia hacks, mainstream media, corp

This week on Act Out!, war is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength—and it's still Russia's fault.

Posted 5 days 15 hours ago
anti-Trump protests, Inauguration Day protests, anti-Trump movement, Socialist Alternative, Students for a Democratic Society, student walkouts, Black Lives Matter, police brutality, authoritarian rule

The protests against Donald Trump on his Inauguration Day could stand out as one of the largest counter-inaugural protests in U.S. history – and organizers insist this is only the beginning of a broader resistance movement.

Posted 5 days 15 hours ago

“It’s important that everybody go there. This will have an effect.” -Michael Moore

Posted 6 days 4 hours ago
Spectra Energy, Spectra pipeline, Indian Point nuclear power plant, Andrew Cuomo, Martin Stolar, National Lawyers Guild, pipeline spills, pipeline disasters, AIM pipeline, Resist Spectra, Sane Energy Project, Algonquin Pipeline Expansion

The defendants' argument hinges on the interpretation of “imminent danger” – in this case, proving that the pipeline construction blockade was necessary to prevent a disaster far more harmful to the public's interest than lost corporate profit.

Posted 6 days 4 hours ago
Bayou Bridge Pipeline, Dakota Access Pipeline, #NoDAPL, Energy Transfer Partners, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Southeast Louisiana Protection Authority-East, pipeline spills, Atchafalaya Basinkeeper, Atchafalaya Basin, Lousiana oil industry, Florida Gas

Opponents of a proposed pipeline through Louisiana’s fragile Atchafalaya Basin have vowed to halt its construction, starting with a vocal protest at a Jan. 12 public meeting being attended by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Baton Rouge.

Posted 5 days 15 hours ago

“It’s important that everybody go there. This will have an effect.” -Michael Moore

creative activism, Act Out, 1984, George Orwell, Ministry of Truth, NDAA, Global Engagement Center, Countering Disinformation and Propaganda Act, red scare, blame russia, James Clapper, NSA, national intelligence, CIA, Russia hacks, mainstream media, corp

This week on Act Out!, war is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength—and it's still Russia's fault.

Zapatistas, EZLN, Mexico indigenous populations, Chiapas struggle, direct democracy, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés

“This council proposes to govern this country,” the Zapatista Army of National Liberation said.

Spectra Energy, Spectra pipeline, Indian Point nuclear power plant, Andrew Cuomo, Martin Stolar, National Lawyers Guild, pipeline spills, pipeline disasters, AIM pipeline, Resist Spectra, Sane Energy Project, Algonquin Pipeline Expansion

The defendants' argument hinges on the interpretation of “imminent danger” – in this case, proving that the pipeline construction blockade was necessary to prevent a disaster far more harmful to the public's interest than lost corporate profit.

labor unions, rising inequality, rising poverty, rising cost of living, deregulation, tax cuts for the rich, stagnant wages, falling middle class

Multiple developments contributed in recent decades to the decline of prosperity – much of it due to deliberate but gradual social and financial engineering.