Economics: A Poem

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Economics: A Poem

Economics: A Poem
Fri, 11/2/2012 - by John Clark

Photo: Dela Andy Kumahor

I know how the bank robber felt

when he made some stupid mistake,

some one unheeded thing that could have

made all the difference

and ended the scene with a clean

getaway,

off to vacation

in a place that hates America enough

to preclude extradition.

<<>>

I know the feeling;

I know it, and it hurts.

<<>>

It’s just like the one

where I didn’t figure out

in time

that paper was a path to money,

the one where hedge funds

could have been about gardening

for all I knew

when I rose each morning to work

and visited the early sun

when it still shone on us all

with equal force —

before the top of the food chain took the lion’s share

on its way to the lambs

then began blaming the compass points

as unnumbered futures darkened —

<<>>

as light itself was bent

by the will of a new gravity

like some plutocratic black hole

with irresistible need at the heart

of its furnaces,

<<>>

and we, late to realize

that everything was being pulled

and pulled and pulled

<<>>

weirdly jealous,

wanting to be at a party, too,

to enjoy some unalloyed pinnacle of something

before the end,

<<>>

before history testifies:

These were our stars;

this was our galaxy.

Article Tabs

Comcast spent $18.8 million on lobbying last year – among the top for U.S. corporations – and operates a giant revolving door with Washington, making it an already too-powerful communications giant.

Faceless hedge funds and nameless investors are replacing landlords in many low-income and foreclosed-on neighborhoods — often with disastrous consequences.

One lesson of the Heartbleed bug is that the U.S. needs to stop running Internet security like a Wikipedia volunteer project.

Corruption rules in India – and as the world’s largest democracy goes to the polls this month, the Common Man’s Party has emerged as a new hope promising a corruption-free future.

Depriving the homeless of their last shelter is Silicon Valley at its worst – especially when rich cities aren't doing anything to end homelessness.

Revolts are shaking the world, bursting in the most unexpected places, but they rarely take power. Is the big explosion still coming?

Posted 4 days 20 hours ago

Anyone who has ever gone "skipping," or "dumpster diving," knows that shops regularly throw out masses of perfectly edible food.

Posted 6 days 17 hours ago

The Vermont Senate passed a bill to require labeling on all GMO foods sold in the state – signaling a wave of nationwide victories against the Gene Giants may be underway.

Posted 4 days 19 hours ago

Life in tent encampments, vehicles, motels, and storage units - REAL CHANGE focuses on four men who sell Real Change News, a street newspaper in Seattle. Follow ROBERT, GEORGE, DANIEL, and BUDDY as they navigate the less visible side of homelessness in America. Despite their struggles, they persevere. Each sells newspapers to get by.

Posted 5 days 20 hours ago

From climate change to Crimea, the natural gas industry is supreme at exploiting crisis for private gain.

Posted 4 days 20 hours ago

The moose die-off is new, complex and often described by the same word people use when they mention climate change: mysterious. That insects like the tick can be a major force wiping out the mighty moose is worth pondering.

Before going to Mayflower, I had never seen tar sands bitumen in person. I had never smelled it, nor had I experienced how it starts to sicken you the minute you get near it: headaches, burning throat, fatigue, gut-aches, vomiting and diarrhea.

Where’s the big money in privatization? Take it from the teachers.

The capture by the executive class of so much wealth performs no useful function. On the contrary, essential public services are cut so that the rich may pay less tax.

In terms of historical comparisons, Occupy the S.E.C. reminds me of various elements of populism that the United States experienced at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries.

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