If I Could Change the World

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If I Could Change the World

If I Could Change the World
Mon, 5/14/2012

Filmmaker Bianca Smith captures Occupy Los Angeles as they come from the north, south, east and west to converge into a Workers' Day celebration. "We are babysitters, nannies, we're gardeners, janitors, security guards," a woman shouts at a union rally. "We're all kinds of workers, and we demand respect!"

Marchers also share their visions of a more just world. "My version of a perfect society would be someplace where everyone has an equal opportunity to live up to their potential," a young man says. "I think that's the ideal place to live in."

Smith explains, "We had been anticipating for the May 1 General Strike (M1GS) for several weeks. Once the date got closer we held a couple meetings to talk about how we could cover all bases throughout the day. We knew that M1GS planned to flood the city in four "winds" (north, south, east, west) until the marches and caravans converged in Downtown LA. We created a camera team for each wind, composed solely of film students from The Los Angeles Film School, and we interviewed the likes of every culture and walk of life we could. Los Angeles is a city full of diversity and we wanted to capture that. There are a multitude of different types of people with a multitude of issues at hand to be dealt with.  We wanted to convey the spirit of people, and I think we're all very happy with the results. This is a beautiful movement with real momentum, and I believe the medium of film and internet can play a very important role in that.

Article Tabs

We must shift the national plan of action – taking the climate justice fight to the extraction hot spots, from Appalachia to Alaska and from the heartland to the coastal rigs and carbon export terminals.

It’s the first time one century has wrecked the prospects of the millennia to come, and it makes us mad enough to march – for those generations yet to come, our children, grandchildren, and their children.

The Rolling Jubilee group that grew out of Occupy Wall Street has purchased and eliminated a portfolio of private student loans worth millions at Corinthian Colleges in California.

Our window of opportunity to mitigate the climate crisis is narrow – and while it sometimes feels like an impossible burden, history shows people-powered movements like ours have succeeded before.

The solution to climate change is a system change – grounded in human rights and ecological stewardship, where communities and workers are in charge of investment priorities ensuring the right to live and work with dignity.

Organizers haven't been shy about their underlying intentions: using the September march in Manhattan as a platform on which to build an international environmental social movement unlike any previously seen.

Posted 5 days 3 hours ago

If you're planning to take to the streets in New York City or elsewhere this week, know that today's IMSI technology used by police or the FBI could greatly affect the privacy of your cell phone and protest communications.

Posted 3 days 3 hours ago

Shifting toward community-based renewable power is a strong thread running through Scotland's Radical Independence Campaign, and a free Scotland could inspire other countries to relinquish their fossil fuel addiction.

Posted 3 days 23 hours ago

"We know it is fraud. They know it is fraud. We look to anyone brave enough to stand up and defend the rights of the people," says homeowner defender Sherry Hernandez.

Posted 5 days 4 hours ago

Using social media and alternative news networks, activists and citizen journalists have found new ways to tell Americans the real story – it's immediate, it's personal, its electronic and its everywhere.

Posted 3 days 3 hours ago

The folks at Occupy Animator have broken down the reasons we Occupy in terms even non-occupiers can understand.

The wealthiest Americans receive the greatest benefits – and they insult the rest of us by treating their tax responsibility like a game.

The Politics of Indifference, Canadian-style

Whether they agree with the methods or goals of the Occupy Movement or not, Canadians are slowly becoming aware of how inequality is fragmenting and harming our society.

The trial of General Efrain Rios Montt, 86, the former U.S.-backed de facto president of Guatemala, has begun, spotlighting the killing of 1,800 indigenous people during his country's civil war.

People sometimes have the power to make change happen — if and when they come together and act.

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