VIDEO PREMIERE - Imagining an Occupy Blitzkrieg

Search form

VIDEO PREMIERE - Imagining an Occupy Blitzkrieg

VIDEO PREMIERE - Imagining an Occupy Blitzkrieg
Thu, 4/12/2012

Filmmaker: Corey Ogilvie. Film title - Occupy Blitzkrieg

"It is possible to be militantly non-violent."

With this quote, Martin Luther King, Jr. embraced two sides of a dichotomy that often arises within social movements: the question of whether to be militant or non-violent. There is a long history steeped in both approaches, from Gandhi's non-violent civil disobedience to guerilla war tactics employed to overthrow oppressive regimes.

Filmmaker Corey Ogilvie agrees with MLK in regards to being well organized and disciplined in non-violent power struggle. His film craftily evokes the post-WWII era in which Americans were united against a foreign enemy, except the enemies in this piece are not the Axis Powers but the greedy bankers within our borders. Ogilvie takes the motif of the American war machine and turns it on its head with the assistance 1950's-era cartoons and television and film footage, and the result is a fun, engaging and informative piece of propaganda brought to you by the filmmaker of the popular #OWS video, "I Am Not Moving".

"Considering MLK's statement led me to the question: What would a nonviolent blitzkrieg look like?" Ogilvie said. "Imagine if all the elements of Occupy - organizers, protesters, flashmobs, whistleblowers, donors, filmmakers, journalists and hacktivists - could focus fire on just one government official, one bank, one corporation, one institution, all at once, for one month, with one simple demand. Blitzkrieg simplifies the complexity of the battlefield for the attacker, focusing every weapon on one target at one time. This made it the most groundbreaking strategy in the history of violence. Maybe it also has a place in the history of nonviolence."

Check out more films from Occupy The Movie.

 

Article Tabs

Things are heating up inside Wall Street’s new rental empire.

The legitimacy of the U.S. government is now in question. It is up to us to use McCutcheon to energize the movement against money-corruption of the government and economy.

Walmart and the Walton family receive tax breaks and taxpayer subsidies estimated at more than $7.8 billion a year – that is enough money to hire 105,000 new public school teachers.

In San Francisco and the Bay Area especially, the Heartbleed bug has put the issue of privacy and online security at the forefront of Internet activism.

The newspapers were awarded the highest accolade in U.S. journalism for their groundbreaking articles on the NSA’s surveillance activities based on the leaks of Edward Snowden.

If you can’t overthrow the government overnight, you might try to unseat a Congressman burdened with an atrocious voting record, something Carl Gibson shows us step-by-step how to do in his new book.

Posted 6 days 17 hours ago

A series of potential jurors voiced opposition to Occupy Wall Street as Cecily McMillan, 25, faces seven years in prison for assault.

Posted 4 days 17 hours ago

"Right now the future of Spain's youth looks pretty black. The country is not creating anything. With minimal job opportunities, many young people are going to other countries to find work.”

Posted 4 days 18 hours ago

The new 192-page book documents the activities of Occupy Austin and includes photographs of marches, arrests, assemblies, court trials, the camp itself and even law enforcement infiltration.

Posted 4 days 17 hours ago

New research finds that richest 0.1 percent of Americans have doubled their share of the pie, dramatically expanding their portion of the country's wealth in three decades.

Posted 4 days 17 hours ago

In Washington, where the state of war and the surveillance state are one and the same, top officials have begun to call for Edward Snowden’s head.

A two-day long housing protest outside the Department of Justice this week has resulted in nearly 30 arrests and several instances of law enforcement unnecessarily using tasers on activists.

More than 1.1 million students in the U.S. were homeless last year, a record high, according to new data released by the U.S. Department of Education. Nearly 2 percent of all students in K-12 are now living without homes.

Labor's Big Test in Michigan

Workers in Michigan may soon earn the right to organize and bargain collectively through labor unions.

Inequality-Fighting Lawmakers Won Big in Election

House members who got A+ grades for working to narrow America's economic divide were rewarded last week with election victories.

Sign Up