VIDEO PREMIERE: Profiles of Courage

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VIDEO PREMIERE: Profiles of Courage

VIDEO PREMIERE: Profiles of Courage
Fri, 5/4/2012

Here are two Occupy.com originals inaugurating a new series, Profiles in Courage, where we plan to introduce viewers to the occupiers fighting to make their world a better, more just, more sustainable place.

As a police captain and a bishop, Ray Lewis and George Packard inhabit roles in society that don't lend themselves to activism. But they bucked convention and sided with the people they vowed to counsel and protect. Other police officers were not as kind to the Occupy Movement, and other clergy were certainly not as brave as Episcopal Bishop George Packard, who challenged Trinity Church, one of the largest landowners in New York City, when it denied much-needed space to Occupy Wall Street.

The director, producer and executive producer of these pieces—David Sauvage, Seth Cohen and Lawrence Taubman, respectively—are the founders of Occupy.com. Beth Bogart, one of the original members of the OWS PR Working Group, worked with David and Seth to produce the piece and connected them with the Captain and the Bishop.

"The church needed, at this moment in history, to stand alongside these protesters," Bishop Packard says in the film. "The truth of Christ is found in the streets, in the honesty and the integrity and the insistence of people that you find in Occupy Wall Street."

More original programming is in the works, including a news show with none other than Jesse LaGreca. Get ready.

Credit: David Sauvage

Article Tabs

Spanish tax resisters and activists from the 15M movement have joined forces to organize a sharing economy network – and to nourish it with redirected taxes.

Christopher Dell pushed through a deal for Bechtel Corporation, America's largest engineering and construction firm, to build the costly "Patriotic Highway" to Albania – then was hired by the firm.

Paul has paired his retrograde economic ideas with a very outspoken stance against militarism and the espionage state – but is a zero-regulated free market what young voters really want?

Anyone who has ever gone "skipping," or "dumpster diving," knows that shops regularly throw out masses of perfectly edible food.

The fees Wall Street extracts from public entities like the ones in L.A. could total more than $50 billion a year – enough to provide free tuition at every public college and university in the country.

A series of potential jurors voiced opposition to Occupy Wall Street as Cecily McMillan, 25, faces seven years in prison for assault.

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"Right now the future of Spain's youth looks pretty black. The country is not creating anything. With minimal job opportunities, many young people are going to other countries to find work.”

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The new 192-page book documents the activities of Occupy Austin and includes photographs of marches, arrests, assemblies, court trials, the camp itself and even law enforcement infiltration.

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New research finds that richest 0.1 percent of Americans have doubled their share of the pie, dramatically expanding their portion of the country's wealth in three decades.

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In All the Presidents' Bankers, Nomi Prins writes a painstakingly researched history of the financial industry's collusion with the White House to create a self-serving United States financial policy.

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Mr. Fish/PoliticalCartoons.com

I agree with the OWS activists who say electoral politics isn't the solution. But kicking the worst offenders out of office and putting our people in is a hell of a start. The 2014 midterms could be our year.

Amazon signed a $600 million cloud-computing deal with the CIA making it responsible for keeping state secrets, aggregating data and helping with drone strikes.

Two New Fraud Deals Show Wall Street's Washington Insiders at Work

No more deals. No more negotiations. Not until we’re in the room. Not until we’re seated in the chair, at the table, in the chambers of justice, that have always rightfully belonged to us – and only us.

The small South American country is set to become the first in the world where the sale of cannabis will not only become legal and government-controlled, but at around $1 a gram, probably also the one with the most affordable marijuana anywhere.

Thousands of people protesting U.S. drone strikes on Saturday blocked a road in northwest Pakistan that is used to move NATO troop supplies and equipment in and out of Afghanistan.

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