VIDEO PREMIERE: Profiles of Courage

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VIDEO PREMIERE: Profiles of Courage

VIDEO PREMIERE: Profiles of Courage
Fri, 5/4/2012

Here are two Occupy.com originals inaugurating a new series, Profiles in Courage, where we plan to introduce viewers to the occupiers fighting to make their world a better, more just, more sustainable place.

As a police captain and a bishop, Ray Lewis and George Packard inhabit roles in society that don't lend themselves to activism. But they bucked convention and sided with the people they vowed to counsel and protect. Other police officers were not as kind to the Occupy Movement, and other clergy were certainly not as brave as Episcopal Bishop George Packard, who challenged Trinity Church, one of the largest landowners in New York City, when it denied much-needed space to Occupy Wall Street.

The director, producer and executive producer of these pieces—David Sauvage, Seth Cohen and Lawrence Taubman, respectively—are the founders of Occupy.com. Beth Bogart, one of the original members of the OWS PR Working Group, worked with David and Seth to produce the piece and connected them with the Captain and the Bishop.

"The church needed, at this moment in history, to stand alongside these protesters," Bishop Packard says in the film. "The truth of Christ is found in the streets, in the honesty and the integrity and the insistence of people that you find in Occupy Wall Street."

More original programming is in the works, including a news show with none other than Jesse LaGreca. Get ready.

Credit: David Sauvage

Article Tabs

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